Comic-Con: First images from Sam Raimi’s ‘Oz: The Great and Powerful’, but film has no Tin Man or Scarecrow





The first ever trailer for Sam Raimi and Disney’s Oz: The Great and Powerful was revealed at Comic-Con this week, and Disney very kindly allowed the trailer online for fans not lucky enough to be at the convention.

Now even more good stuff has been shared by Disney as they have released six new images from the film, each one with its own description. You can check out the images at the bottom of this post, and you can find the trailer and other Oz: The Great and Powerful related news here

Sam Raimi attended Comic Con to talk about his new film, and while he did reveal some shocking news that both the Tin Man and Scarecrow would not be appearing in the film, he did have an awful lot more to say. However, with this film being about the Wizard himself and his attempt to work out who is good and who is bad in Oz, we are not technically in Dorothy territory so why would we have the Tin Man and Scarecrow? Either way, they won’t be here. Moving on…

Raimi went on to explain a little more about his film, and what we can expect to see in it: “The Wicked Witch has an army of flying baboons. And we saw a glimpse of them [in the trailer]. It’s the first animation that’s completed on it. There’s also a flying monkey story, different than the baboons. A nice flying monkey, so don’t worry,”

“It’s the story of a selfish man, who’s a little bit of a lothario, a little bit of a cad,” he said about James Franco‘s Oz. “It’s how he became ensconced in the Emerald City. By the time this picture ends, the audience has one interpretation of how it all came to be […] how he became the protector of that great city.”

A scene from the destruction of China Towne in Oz the Great and Poweful
Photo: Walt Disney Pictures

Oscar Diggs (James Franco) and the witch Theodora (Mila Kunis) travel the Yellow Brick Road on their way to The Emerald City in Oz the Great and Poweful
Photo: Walt Disney Pictures

Oscar Diggs (James Franco) and the witch Theodora (Mila Kunis) stand on a precipice overlooking a valley in the Land of Oz in Oz the Great and Poweful
Photo: Walt Disney Pictures

Glinda (Michelle Williams), the Good Witch, invokes her powers in Oz the Great and Poweful
Photo: Walt Disney Pictures

Oscar Diggs (James Franco) lands his hot air balloon in a pond in the Land of Oz and encounters the witch Theodora (Mila Kunis) in Oz the Great and Poweful
Photo: Walt Disney Pictures

Sam Raimi directs from a screenplay written by Mitchell Kapner, and the story is based on the novel written by L. Frank Baum. The credited cast includes James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, Rachel Weisz, Abigail Spencer, Joey King, Zach Braff and Martin Klebba.

Synopsis:

Disney’s fantastical adventure “Oz The Great and Powerful,” directed by Sam Raimi, imagines the origins of L. Frank Baum’s beloved character, the Wizard of Oz. When Oscar Diggs (James Franco), a small-time circus magician with dubious ethics, is hurled away from dusty Kansas to the vibrant Land of Oz, he thinks he’s hit the jackpot—fame and fortune are his for the taking—that is until he meets three witches, Theodora (Mila Kunis), Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and Glinda (Michelle Williams), who are not convinced he is the great wizard everyone’s been expecting. Reluctantly drawn into the epic problems facing the Land of Oz and its inhabitants, Oscar must find out who is good and who is evil before it is too late. Putting his magical arts to use through illusion, ingenuity—and even a bit of wizardry—Oscar transforms himself not only into the great and powerful Wizard of Oz but into a better man as well.

When small-time magician Oscar Diggs (James Franco) pulls one flimflam too many, he finds himself hurled into the fantastical Land of Oz where he must somehow transform himself into the great and powerful Wizard — and just maybe into a better man as well.

By Matt Wavish

About Matt Wavish 10002 Articles
A keen enthusiast and collector of all horror and extreme films. I can be picky as i like quality in my horror. This doesn't necessarily mean it has to be a classic, but as long as it has something to impress me then i'm a fan. I watch films by the rule that if it doesn't bring out some kind of emotive response then it aint worth watching.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*