Alfonso Cuaron wins DGA award for ‘Gravity’





gravity

 

Alfonso Cuaron’s Gravity was a stunning achievement in out of this world filmmaking. It took Cuaron five years to put the visual feast together, and it looks likely that the film just might sweep the Oscars.

However, it has films like 12 Years a Slave, American Hustle and Captain Phillips to contend with. In some positive news, and a good hint at just who might win Best Director at the Oscars, Curan has won the Directors Guild of America award for his superb space thriller.

Per Variety:

Alfonso Cuaron has won the Directors Guild of America award for feature film for his high-tech space thriller  “Gravity.”

The Mexico native won over Paul Greengrass (“Captain Phillips”), Steve McQueen (“12 Years a Slave”), David O. Russell (“American Hustle”) and Martin Scorsese (“The Wolf of Wall Street”).

“This is truly an honor and I’m humbled by it,” Cuaron said in his acceptance speech. “I still have this teen crush on other directors.”

Cuaron, who spent five years developing “Gravity,” noted that photos from space show that the Earth is “absolutely beautiful” but do not depict the human experience.

“It’s a bizarre experiment of nature, that is the human experience,” he noted. “And it’s what we as directors try to sort out as filmmakers.”

The winner was announced by last year’s winner Ben Affleck at the conclusion of the 66th DGA Awards ceremonies at the Century Plaza Hotel, based on voting by the 15,000 DGA members.

The DGA win comes a week after “Gravity” and “12 Years a Slave” tied for the top award by the Producers Guild of America while “American Hustle” won the SAG cast ensemble award. Two weeks ago, “12 Years a Slave” won the Golden Globe for best drama and “American Hustle” won for best comedy.

Affleck won the DGA award last year for “Argo,” becoming only the seventh DGA winner not to also receive a directing Oscar in the 65 years of the DGA Awards. The DGA and Oscar had matched for the nine previous years, last diverging in 2003, when it selected Marshall for “Chicago” and the Oscar went to Roman Polanski for “The Pianist.”

Cuaron’s 91-minute film has overperformed at the box office with $678 million worldwide. He co-wrote the script with his son Jonas Cuaron as an exploration of  “adversity and the possibility of rebirth as an outcome of adversities.”

“Gravity” was Cuaron’s first film since 2006?s “Children of Men.” He’s been nominated for six Academy Awards: original screenplay for “Y Tu Mamá También,” adapted screenplay and editing for “Children of Men” and Best Picture, director and editor for “Gravity.”

About Matt Wavish 10003 Articles
A keen enthusiast and collector of all horror and extreme films. I can be picky as i like quality in my horror. This doesn't necessarily mean it has to be a classic, but as long as it has something to impress me then i'm a fan. I watch films by the rule that if it doesn't bring out some kind of emotive response then it aint worth watching.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*